GermZAPP in HOSPITALS

GermZAPP is the most affordable, objective, automatic hand hygiene education system that measures and tracks frequency and duration of hand washing to meet the requirements of having a compliant hand hygiene program as set by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization’s ( JCAHO)  National Patient Safety Goal # 7.

Joint Commission’s National Patient Safety Goal #7

National Patient Safety Goals® Effective January 2024 for the Hospital Program

Reduce the risk of health care-associated infections.

Comply with either the current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) hand hygiene guidelines and/or the current World Health Organization (WHO) hand hygiene guidelines.

Element(s) of Performance for NPSG.07.01.01

  1. Implement a program that follows categories IA, IB, and IC of either the current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and/or the current World Health Organization (WHO) hand hygiene guidelines.
    (See also IC.01.04.01, EP 1)
  2. Set goals for improving compliance with hand hygiene guidelines. (See also IC.03.01.01, EP 1)
  3. Improve compliance with hand hygiene guidelines based on established goals.

if a Joint Commission surveyor witnesses any staff member in the process of direct patient care fail to follow hand hygiene protocols (even if it is just one time), your facility will be cited with a RFI and potentially lose accreditation if you are unable to show improvement.  Having a monitoring tool and/or improvement program in place is no longer sufficient to meet Joint Commission requirements. Handwashing compliance must be performed 100% of the time.(JCAHO, 2018) 

National Patient Safety Goals®

Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings Recommendations

Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the    HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force.

Guideline for Hand Hygiene in Health-Care Settings

Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and the HICPAC/SHEA/APIC/IDSA Hand Hygiene Task Force.

Methods Used To Promote Improved Hand Hygiene

Hand-hygiene promotion has been challenging for >150 years. In-service education, information leaflets, workshops and lectures, automated dispensers, and performance feedback on hand-hygiene adherence rates have been associated with transient improvement (291,294–296,306,314).

Several strategies for promotion of hand hygiene in hospi- tals have been published (Table 9). These strategies require education, motivation, or system change. Certain strategies are based on epidemiologic evidence, others on the authors’ and other investigators’ experience and review of current knowledge. Some strategies may be unnecessary in certain cir- cumstances, but may be helpful in others. In particular, chang- ing the hand-hygiene agent could be beneficial in institutions or hospital wards with a high workload and a high demand for hand hygiene when alcohol-based hand rubs are not avail- able (11,73,78,328). However, a change in the recommended hand-hygiene agent could be deleterious if introduced during winter, at a time of higher hand-skin irritability, and if not accompanied by the provision of skin-care products (e.g., pro-

tective creams and lotions). Additional specific elements should be considered for inclusion in educational and motivational programs (Box 2).

Several strategies that could potentially be associated with successful promotion of hand hygiene require a system change (Box 1). Hand-hygiene adherence and promotion involve fac- tors at both the individual and system level. Enhancing indi- vidual and institutional attitudes regarding the feasibility of making changes (self-efficacy), obtaining active participation of personnel at both levels, and promoting an institutional safety climate represent challenges that exceed the current per- ception of the role of infection-control professionals.

Whether increased education, individual reinforcement tech- nique, appropriate rewarding, administrative sanction, enhanced self-participation, active involvement of a larger number of organizational leaders, enhanced perception of health threat, self-efficacy, and perceived social pressure (12,317,329,330), or combinations of these factors can improve HCWs’ adherence with hand hygiene needs further investigation. Ultimately, adherence to recommended hand- hygiene practices should become part of a culture of patient safety where a set of interdependent quality elements interact to achieve a shared objective (331).

On the basis of both these hypothetical considerations and successful, actual experiences in certain institutions, strategies to improve adherence to hand-hygiene practices should be both multimodal and multidisciplinary. However, strategies must be further researched before they are implemented.

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